Fourth Young Cultural Innovators Forum Highlights Benefits of Collaboration and Exchange

Participants exchanged their cultures, passions, opinions, and individual talents and explored how diversity in art is perceived and how it impacts communities. They were able to develop their vision, entrepreneurial skills, global networks, and explore new strategies for innovation in their own cities.

Fourth Young Cultural Innovators Forum Highlights Benefits of Collaboration and Exchange

Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators IV

SALZBURG, AUSTRIA – Young cultural innovators from Canada joined artists, entrepreneurs, designers, dancers, architects, poets, and a host of other young creatives from around the world for the fourth session of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators (YCI).

The six-day program, which took place at Schloss Leopoldskron in Salzburg, Austria between October 14-19, brought together 50 of the brightest and creative minds catalyzing urban and social transformation in their communities.

Young artists and cultural leaders from all continents took part in this year’s Forum, representing the following cities and regions: Adelaide, Athens, Baltimore, Buenos Aires, Canada, Cape Town, Detroit, Malta, Manila, Memphis, Nairobi, New Orleans, Mekong Delta region, Salzburg, Seoul, Tirana, and Tokyo.

Participants exchanged their cultures, passions, opinions, and individual talents and explored how diversity in art is perceived and how it impacts communities. They were able to develop their vision, entrepreneurial skills, global networks, and explore new strategies for innovation in their own cities.

This year’s Forum included skills workshops focused on human-centered design, leadership and values, storytelling in the age of noise, and entrepreneurship.

The exchanges throughout the program helped refresh the participants’ vision and strategic thinking. A number of participants said the experience allowed them to enrich each other through different beliefs and approaches. Many suggested their participation in the Forum had been a “life-changing experience.”

One participant said that by asking them to face challenges that could only be solved through collaboration, the session had made them more committed to working with people from different sectors and backgrounds, as the variety of inputs helped them complement each other and break down barriers.

This was the fourth year of the 10-year Forum run by Salzburg Global Seminar and the first year that a group from Canada participated.
 
Participants included Marc Pronovost, general manager and artistic director of B21; Jung-Suk Ryu, executive director of the Indefinite Arts Centre; Nikki Shaffeeullah, artistic director of The AMY Project; Patrick Shannon, owner of InnoNative; and Helen Yung, an artist-researcher for the Culture of Cities Centre. Their participation in the Forum was made possible with support from the Canada Council for the Arts.

Most of this year’s participants came from YCI hubs that Salzburg Global has developed with partners in cities and regions all around the world. These hubs form the core of the YCI multi-year program and enable YCIs to maintain the connections they have made, share learnings with their peers and communities, and act as a local resource for other emerging innovators.

Susanna Seidl-Fox, Program Director for Culture and the Arts at Salzburg Global, said: “The YCI Forum focuses on young creative change-makers who are already making a difference in their communities worldwide. The YCI Forum supports, connects, and encourages them through the global YCI network, which now has more than 200 members on all continents. We seek to provide the skills, contacts, and inspiration they need to take their work to the next level and make change happen at greater scale.”