How Could PBS' "The Great War" Write The Most Decorated African American Unit Out Of The Script?

How could the most important untold story of modern civil rights, a WWI story with the power to help heal a racially polarized America, be ignored?

How Could PBS' "The Great War" Write The Most Decorated African American Unit Out Of The Script?

A PASSAGE WAY IN THE UNDERGRPOPUND TUNNEL COMPLEX USED DURING WW I. PHOTO CREDIT to JEFF GUSKY, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

PBS Aired "The Great War" the story of World War I, told through the voices of the doctors, nurses, aviators and troops, including the African American combat regiment known as The Harlem Hell Fighters. But how could the most decorated African American World War I combat unit ...the unit with the first and only black recipient of the Congressional Medal of Honor (until 2015)...the unit which suffered the most casualties of any African American WWI combat unit be written out of the script?

And how could the most important untold story of modern civil rights, a WWI story with the power to help heal a racially polarized America, be ignored? Why The American Experience’s "The Great War" would amplify myths about the legend of the Harlem Hell Fighters while artfully making the extraordinary service of the three other African American combat regiments invisible is disturbing.

Last year, Jeff Gusky, medical doctor, National Geogrpahic photographer and explorer, found and photographed the only modern day remains of the last Americans fighting,

The Black Devils. Jeff explains what PBS' "The Great War" got wrong and outlines the facts in this must read Huffington Post article.