Role of Gender, Race, Ethnicity, Parental Status, In Woman’s Workplace Conflicts Examined in New Book

Andrea S. Kramer (Andie) and Alton B. Harris (Al) are distinguished attorneys, married to each other, and co-authors of Breaking Through Bias: Communication Techniques for Women to Succeed at Work

Role of Gender, Race, Ethnicity, Parental Status, In Woman’s Workplace Conflicts Examined in New Book

IT’S NOT YOU, IT’S THE WORKPLACE is for women, men, leaders, and board members. Men and organizations can learn how best to create a supportive work environment for women and to develop a broad, diverse, and talented leadership pipeline.

In IT’S NOT YOU, IT’S THE WORKPLACE: Women’s Conflict at Work and the Bias That Built It (Nicholas Brealey Book, August 27, 2019) they argue that these conflicts are rooted in two bias-driven workplace dynamics: 1) the obstacles to career advancement women encounter simply because they are women, and 2) the misunderstandings and stereotypes they face in working with women whose social identities are different from their own—be it because of race, ethnicity, age, sexual orientation, or parental status.

IT’S NOT YOU, IT’S THE WORKPLACE offers a fresh approach to help readers recognize their own biases, those of their co-workers and supervisors, and those embedded in the institutional practices with which they must conform. Andie & Al provide detailed action plans for both individuals and organizations to follow to avoid and overcome the discriminatory effects of these biases. [MORE BELOW]

Filled with practical real-world advice and tactics, IT’S NOT YOU, IT’S THE WORKPLACE:
1) Debunks the myths and misconceptions about the causes of women’s workplace conflicts. These conflicts are not because women are inherently hostile or competitive with one another but because the workplaces where they are pursuing careers are so highly gendered that they force them into situations in which such conflicts are all but inevitable.

2) Examines the various discriminatory biases present in our gendered workplaces and the lose-lose choices women feel they must make because of them. These biases explain why women so often choose to “become one of the boys,” accept second class status, or leaving their workplaces entirely.
Explains why “sisterhood” is so important and why strong, effective sisterhoods do not depend on close personal friendships.

3) Makes clear that gender is not the whole story; women’s many different social identities are equally important. Whether these differing identities are because of race, ethnicity, sexual preference, age, or parental status, they have differing stereotypes associated with them and these stereotypes are a further source of women’s workplace conflicts.

4) Presents a comprehensive perspective on how women’s distinctive difficulties with other women can be addressed and offers detailed steps and advice as to how women can overcome their conflicts.

5) Presents a concrete program that organizations can use to attack workplace bias and create welcoming workplaces for everyone.

IT’S NOT YOU, IT’S THE WORKPLACE is for women, men, leaders, and board members. Men and organizations can learn how best to create a supportive work environment for women and to develop a broad, diverse, and talented leadership pipeline.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS:
Andrea S. Kramer (Andie) and Alton B. Harris (Al) are distinguished attorneys, married to each other, and co-authors of Breaking Through Bias: Communication Techniques for Women to Succeed at Work (Bibliomotion, May 2016). For decades, Andie and Al have tackled gender bias in the workplace through speaking, workshops, articles, blog posts, podcasts, one-on-one counselling, and engagements with national and international business and professional organizations. They have appeared in The New York Times, Harvard Business Review, The Wall Street Journal, Forbes, The Huffington Post, The Chicago Tribune, Fast Company, Crain's, and many other publications. They provide practical techniques that women, men, and organizations can use to prevent the gender stereotypes and the biases that flow from them from slowing down or derailing women’s careers.